66 in 52 Challenge

Jeremiah – Week 24 and 25 {66 in 52 Challenge}

This is part of the 66 in 52 Bible Journaling Challenge. Over the course of the 52 weeks in 2018, I am focusing in on one verse from each book of the Bible with many others who have signed up to join me. Each week I will post a summary page with some thoughts about that week’s book(s) of the Bible along with some links that may help our reflection. Click here to sign up if you want to join us at any point along the journey! Click here to see where we’ve been so far!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Week 24 - Jeremiah 1-25

Week 25 - Jeremiah 26-52

The Big Picture of Jeremiah:

Jeremiah is another prophet who was called by God to be “a prophet to the nations” (1:5). Like many of us, he wasn’t so sure had the right guy, yet ended up following God not only in warning His people about potential exile but also sharing direction on how to live well in exile. In short, the people of Israel had broken God’s covenant and God was calling them back to obedience. The first 24 chapters outline the areas where the people and leaders are outside of the life God has for them. In chapter 25 we transition and Jeremiah prophesies that Babylon is coming to take the people captive for 70 years which happens later on in the book. In the middle though we see a few chapters filled with prophesies of hope reminding the people it won’t always be this way.

Outline of Jeremiah:

  • 1 – Jeremiah called to be prophet
  • 2-24 – Warnings to Judah
  • 25-29 – Foretelling the Babylonian Exile
  • 30-33 – Promises of Restoration
  • 34-35 – Historical Information
  • 36-38 – Jeremiah Suffers
  • 39-45 – The Fall of Jerusalem and the aftermath
  • 46-49 – Prophesies against other nations
  • 50-51 – Prophesies against Babylon
  • 51 – Historical Information

A Few Key Verses and Possible Reflection Questions/Prayers:

Some of us are planning to read through the whole book each week, while others are just focusing in on one verse. This section of the weekly intro post might help you narrow down a verse to reflect on for the week, but you do not have to choose one of these verse, pick any section of the book you want! These are just some ideas.

  • The Lord gave me this message: “I knew you before I formed you in your mother’s womb. Before you were born I set you apart and appointed you as my prophet to the nations. (Jeremiah 1:4-5)
    REFLECTION: God also knew YOU before you were born and set you apart for work in His Kingdom. Ask God what He made you for and spend some time listening to His response.
  • “‘For I know the plans I have you,’ declares the Lord, ‘plans to prosper you and not ot harm you, plans to give you a hope and a future.” (Jeremiah 29:11)
    REFLECTION: While many know this verse, few know the context. Spend some time reading all of chapter 29. What new insight does this bring this verse put in the context of a people in exile for seventy years? How might that exile bring about the true hope and future God desires for His people?
  • “Call to me and I will answer you and tell you great and unsearchable things you do not know.” (Jeremiah 33:3)
    REFLECTION: What might it look like for you to call out to God this week? What answers do you hope He provides? What “great and unsearchable things has He been showing you recently?

God’s Grace in Jeremiah:

Exile as a response to the people’s disobedience doesn’t seem very graceful, but, as I’ve mentioned before, God’s heart is for his people. He will do whatever it takes to get His people back even if that involves some hard and painful things. He tries first to win them back with His love, but when that doesn’t happen as in this situation, sometimes He allows bad things to happen to draw them back. He is patiently pursuing his children who have wandered again and again and again. He still dreams big dreams for them even in their most rebellious places.  He brings justice against those who hurt them and restores them to their place as His children. Through it all He never disowns them, even when the turn away from Him. Again and again He says, “I will be their God and they will be my people. (31:33)”

Some Other Resources:

The Challenge:

So now it’s your turn! Pick a verse and settle in this week, or read through the whole book. If you post any picture or blogs on social media, tag them with #66in52challenge so we can all share in this journey together!

66 in 52 Challenge

Isaiah (Part 1) – Week 21 {66 in 52 Challenge}

This is part of the 66 in 52 Bible Journaling Challenge. Over the course of the 52 weeks in 2018, I am focusing in on one verse from each book of the Bible with many others who have signed up to join me. Each week I will post a summary page with some thoughts about that week’s book(s) of the Bible along with some links that may help our reflection. Click here to sign up if you want to join us at any point along the journey! Click here to see where we’ve been so far!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Week 22 - Isaiah 1-39

 

The Big Picture of Isaiah:

Isaiah is a book of prophecy. He was called to speak to God’s people and his message was one both of judgment and of hope. Many chapters of this book call the people to repent and return to God’s plan for their lives, and tell of the challenges they will face when they don’t. Ultimately, God tries to woo his people back with his kindness and grace, but when that doesn’t work, He’ll do whatever it takes to get his people back, even if that means letting them suffer at the hands of others for a while. Thankfully Isaiah’s prophecy isn’t all doom and gloom we also get beautiful and hopeful pictures throughout of the ultimate redemption that will come through a Savior. God keeps his covenant promises whether the people do or not and that is also clear in this book. While these themes are both throughout the whole book, we especially see the prophecies of the hard times in chapters 1-39, and the prophesies of the Messiah and hope in 40-66.

Timeline of Isaiah:

The content below was gathered from the She Reads Truth Bible and BibleHub.com and helps us see where the events of this book fit with some of the other books and events in history.

739/740 B.C. – Isaiah called as a Prophet (Isaiah 6)

722 B.C. – Israel invaded by Assyria, end of northern kingdom

715-686 B.C. – King Hezekiah in Judah

712 B.C.  – Hezekiah’s illness and healing (2 Kings 20, Isaiah 38)

701 B.C. – Sennacherib threatens Jerusalem (2 Kings 18, Isaiah 36)

696-642 B.C. – King Manasseh in Judah

681 B.C. – Isaiah’s Death

 

A Few Key Verses and Possible Reflection Questions/Prayers:

Some of us are planning to read through the whole book each week, while others are just focusing in on one verse. This section of the weekly intro post might help you narrow down a verse to reflect on for the week, but you do not have to choose one of these verse, pick any section of the book you want! These are just some ideas.

  • “Come now, let’s settle this,” says the Lord. “Though your sins are like scarlet, I will make them white as snow. Though they are red like crimson, I will make them white as wool.” (Isaiah 2:18)
    REFLECTION: Spend some time in confession this week admitting the ways that sin has infiltrated your life. Then picture all those sins, red like scarlet, being turned bright white, clean, forgiven!
  • “…Look! The virgin will conceive a child! She will give brith to a son and will call him Immanuel (which means ‘God with us’).” (Isaiah 7:14b)
    REFLECTION: Where do you  need God to be Immanuel, God With Us, in this week? Where have you seen His presence recently?
  • And so the Lord says, ‘These people say they are mine. They honor me with their lips, but their hearts are far from me. And their worship of me is nothing but man-made rules learned by rote.'” (Isaiah 29:13)
    REFLECTION: Have you ever found yourself in a season where you were saying all the right words but when you really stopped to think about your heart was far from God? Are there areas of your life where that is true right now? What helped you in the past, or might help you not to refocus your heart on Jesus? 

God’s Grace in Isaiah:

In a long book like this filled with some hard things to hear, it’s easy to focus our attention on some of the more well-known sections looking forward to the hope of the Messiah. However reading the full book gives us an even clearer view of how much we need a Savior and how Jesus really does fulfill each and every prophecy made about Him. We see in Isaiah that reality that sin keeps us from God, but that He was not okay with that reality and enacted a mission to save and redeem us all through Jesus!

Some Other Resources:

The Challenge:

So now it’s your turn! Pick a verse and settle in this week, or read through the whole book. If you post any picture or blogs on social media, tag them with #66in52challenge so we can all share in this journey together!

66 in 52 Challenge

Ecclesiastes and Song of Solomon – Week 21 {66 in 52 Challenge}

This is part of the 66 in 52 Bible Journaling Challenge. Over the course of the 52 weeks in 2018, I am focusing in on one verse from each book of the Bible with many others who have signed up to join me. Each week I will post a summary page with some thoughts about that week’s book(s) of the Bible along with some links that may help our reflection. Click here to sign up if you want to join us at any point along the journey! Click here to see where we’ve been so far!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Week 21 - Ecclesiastes and Song of Solomon

An apology:

First of all, for those following along with the 66 in 52 challenge, I apologize this post is a week late. The best explanation I can give is: Life Happens. I’m sure you all understand that reality and part of living in the joy and blessing of God is giving people, including ourselves some grace.  I knew that at some point in the year I wouldn’t be perfect about getting this up and that time came. 🙂 In any case, whether you read these books already (or are a little behind like me), I hope you enjoy some thoughts about Ecclesiastes and Song of Solomon!

The Big Picture of Ecclesiastes and Song of Song of Solomon:

Solomon is typically credited as the author for both of these books and because of that are likely dated to somewhere around 971-931 B.C.

Along with Job and Proverbs, Ecclesiastes is considered part of the wisdom literature in Scripture. It includes some deep thoughts about the very existence of life itself. I love the way the She Reads Truth Bible describes this book and the benefit it can have in our lives:

“Ecclesiastes is a book that awakens us to our own mortality, begging us to seriously consider how we should live. It knocks away all the facades we use to disguise the fact that life is short and all our accomplishments will pass away. In this way, Ecclesiastes anticipates the NT teaching that only God’s grace, and not our zeal, saves us. … Ecclesiastes prompts us to do two simple but profound things: enjoy life and fear God.”

The Song of Solomon (also known as the Song of Songs) is mainly a celebration of romantic love. While this song mostly describes the intimacy between two human beings, the passionate pursuit in which the woman is sought after, adored, and responds to her lover can lead us to long for the God who passionately pursues us!

A Few Key Verses and Possible Reflection Questions/Prayers:

Some of us are planning to read through the whole book each week, while others are just focusing in on one verse. This section of the weekly intro post might help you narrow down a verse to reflect on for the week, but you do not have to choose one of these verse, pick any section of the book you want! These are just some ideas.

Ecclesiastes:

  • “The greater my wisdom, the greater my grief. To increase knowledge only increases sorrow.” (Ecclesiastes 1:18)
    REFLECTION: Why do you think Solomon would say something like this? When have you experienced this to be true (or false)?
  • “Yet God has made everything beautiful for its own time. He has planted eternity in the human heart, but even so, people cannot see the whole scope of God’s work from beginning to end.” (Ecclesiastes 3:11)
    REFLECTION: What in life feels “not-yet-beautiful” right now? Where do you need God’s grace and patience to wait for the whole picture to come into view and make sense, to become beautiful? Where do you feel the longing for eternity planted deep within your heart?
  • Enjoy what you have rather than desiring what you don’t have. Just dreaming about nice things is meaningless-like chasing the wind.” (Ecclesiastes 6:9)
    REFLECTION: What are five things you’re thankful for today? Besides gratitude, what are some other ways you can keep focused enjoying the blessings you already instead of centering your heart on what you don’t have?

Song of Solomon:

  • “I am my lover’s and he claims me as his own.” (Song of Solomon 7:10)
    REFLECTION: For those of you who are married, what beauty have you found in sharing a name with your spouse? For those that aren’t married and perhaps wish to have the kind of connection described in this book, what comfort can be found the truth of God calling us as his own? How might the book be reassurance that desring this kind of love is good and beautiful, something truly to long after?
  • “A huge torrent cannot extinguish love; rivers cannot sweep it away. If a man tried to buy love with all his wealth, his offer would be utterly scorned.” (Song of Solomon 8:7)
    REFLECTION: What about love seems to make it truly above all else? In what ways do you feel created to love and be loved?

God’s Grace in Ecclesiastes:

At first glance, this book can seem kind of depressing. I didn’t count it up yet, but it sure says “Life is meaningless” enough times to make us wonder what life really is about anyway. However, if you pay careful attention, I think a more accurate understanding might be something like, “Life, as we’ve made it be, is meaningless.” The endless striving for fame, money, sex, etc. is meaningless. Life is meant to be enjoyed and certainly some of those things are enjoyable.  We see Solomon, the richest and wisest man in the world who had everything he could ever want, discover that having a lot or even achieving a lot doesn’t bring lasting fulfillment. In the end He discovers this as of most importance: “So, remember your Creator…” (12:1).  With that in view, the meaningless things fade away. I also found that sometimes God’s grace shows up in unexpected ways: “God keeps such people so busy enjoying life that they take no time to brood over the past.” (5:20) Perhaps that’s key… God longs for us to enjoy life and remember Him.

God’s Grace in Song of Solomon:

I think we could all agree that sexuality has gotten twisted by the fall. If you need any prove just open your phone or pick up a newspaper and count the stories about sexual abuse, misconduct, gender inequality and more. When we read a book like Song of Solomon it can seem a bit over the top or unrealistic. However, I think God wants this passionate picture in Scripture as a reminder of his original plan and design. These insights from Kelley Nikondeha shared in the Jesus Centered Bible seem to describe this better than I could:

“… What if Eve never bit into the fruit? What if Adam never took the next bite and shared in that sweetness that opened the door to shame? Where would we be with not temptation or forbidden fruit, no broken relationship or expulsion from Eden? Can you imagine a world without a curse?

One possible way to understand the wisdom of Song of Songs is to see it as an extravagant dreamscape that gives us a glimpse into Eden. If we had lived in this perpetual garden of delight we would have developed into different people, far freer to explore our intimate relationships without shame. In a curse-free garden, hierarchy and sexual domination never enter the picture. … Women initiate with ease, men reciprocate without threat, and we both practice an unashamed boldness as we share our body with our beloved. …

We wake east of Eden, outside the gates and burdened by the vestiges of the curse. But Jesus enters into this world and plants a new dream in our hearts–setting things right and restoring what’s broken in humanity and creation. … Song of Songs helps us to dream about a mighty wholeness and connectedness. It whets our appetite for a world saturated in love, a worthy description of Jesus’ redemptive mission.”

Some Other Resources:

The Challenge:

So now it’s your turn! Pick a verse and settle in this week, or read through the whole book. If you post any picture or blogs on social media, tag them with #66in52challenge so we can all share in this journey together!

66 in 52 Challenge

Proverbs – Week 20 {66 in 52 Challenge}

This is part of the 66 in 52 Bible Journaling Challenge. Over the course of the 52 weeks in 2018, I am focusing in on one verse from each book of the Bible with many others who have signed up to join me. Each week I will post a summary page with some thoughts about that week’s book(s) of the Bible along with some links that may help our reflection. Click here to sign up if you want to join us at any point along the journey! Click here to see where we’ve been so far!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Week 20 - Proverbs

The Big Picture of Proverbs:

Proverbs is one of three books we consider part of the “wisdom literature” in the Bible, along with Job and Ecclesiastes. Solomon who we met earlier in Scripture is the author of most of them. Having been known as the wisest man on earth, it seems he might have some wise ideas for how we as humans can best live in this world. Throughout the book we often see a contrast given between a wise life and a fool’s life. The first nine chapters give somewhat of an introduction to the book and the rest are filled with short phrases or poems that help us understand and live life well.

Themes in Proverbs:

One study Bible I own has does a great job of laying out some main themes throughout the book of Proverbs in a way that I found helpful. It uses 5 main themes and then gives examples of sub-themes within them. Here are a few examples for each that might be helpful.

God

  • The Commands of God (4:1-4, 6:20-23, 29:18, 30:5)
  • How God sees man (5:21, 16:2,7, 20:24)
  • What God loves (11:1, 15:9, 16:11, 14:31)

Man

  • Adversity (3:25-26, 17:17, 18:14, 24:16)
  • Happiness (3:13, 15:23, 24:17, 29:18)
  • Humility vs Pride (11:2, 15:33, 22:4, 27:1-2)
  • Spiritual and Physical Health (4:20-22, 14:30, 18:14, 25:25)

Relationships

  • Friendship (17:9, 18:24, 19:6, 27:6)
  • Parents and Children (14:26, 19:18, 22:6, 15)
  • Quarrels (3:30-31, 10:12, 17:14, 25:8-9)

Wealth

  • Envy (6:34, 14:30, 21:25-26, 28:16)
  • Generosity and Greed (3:9, 3:27-28, 19:17, 21:26)
  • Security (1:33, 3:9-10, 4:13, 13:6)
  • Wealth vs Poverty (6:10-11, 11:4, 20:21, 22:1-2, 4)

World

  • Faithfulness (11:13, 20:6, 25:13,19, 28:20)
  • Hope and Mercy (13:23, 18:13,17, 21:15, 22:28)
  • Justice (12:17-22, 13:5, 16:6, 20:17)
  • Good vs Evil (1:10-19, 11:3-5, 14:14, 25:21-22)

A Few Key Verses and Possible Reflection Questions/Prayers:

Some of us are planning to read through the whole book each week, while others are just focusing in on one verse. Since Psalms is so long we’re dividing it up over three weeks. This section of the weekly intro post might help you narrow down a verse to reflect on for the week, but you do not have to choose one of these verse, pick any section of the book you want! These are just some ideas.

  • “Commit your actions to the Lord, and your plans will succeed.” (Proverbs 16:33)
    REFLECTION: What do you need to put in God’s hands today?
  • “Gracious words are like a honeycomb, sweetness to the soul and health to the body.” (Proverbs 16:24)
    REFLECTION: Where have you been using less-than-gracious words lately and maybe need to ask for forgiveness? How can you speak life into those around you this week?
  • Give instruction to a wise man, and he will be still wiser; teach a righteous man, and he will increase in learning. (Proverbs 9:9)
    REFLECTION: What is one way you can continue to grow and learn this week even in something you’re already pretty good at?
  • “The fear of the Lord is the beginning of knowledge; fools despise wisdom and discipline. (Proverbs 1:7)
    REFLECTION: How can you go throughout this week in awe and reverence of our God?

Some Other Resources:

The Challenge:

So now it’s your turn! Pick a verse and settle in this week, or read through the whole book. If you post any picture or blogs on social media, tag them with #66in52challenge so we can all share in this journey together!

66 in 52 Challenge

Reflections on Psalms (Part 2)

“Praise the Lord; praise God our savior!
For each day He carries us in His arms.” (Psalm 68:19)

As we go through life each day there are plenty of things that I don’t understand, don’t like, am confused by or wish are different. Each day I hear of, and at times am unfortunately a part of, injustices, inequity, and marginalizing “outsiders”. Each day I hear of the pain and hurt my students and their families are facing and if I’m not intentional, each day can just be too much.

But this is also true:  Each day, we are not alone.

Each day, He helps us see our faults and choose a new way.

Each day, He guides and protects, leads and loves.

Each day, we have reason to praise, no matter what is going on around and in us.

Each day, He is Lord.

Each day, He is Savior.

Each day, His on His throne and nothing can change that.

Each day He carries us in His arms.Thanks be to God!

66 in 52 Challenge

Psalms (Part 1) – Week 17 {66 in 52 Challenge}

This is part of the 66 in 52 Bible Journaling Challenge. Over the course of the 52 weeks in 2018, I am focusing in on one verse from each book of the Bible with many others who have signed up to join me. Each week I will post a summary page with some thoughts about that week’s book(s) of the Bible along with some links that may help our reflection. Click here to sign up if you want to join us at any point along the journey! Click here to see where we’ve been so far!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Week 17 - Psalms 1-50

The Big Picture of Psalms:

The word “psalm” is used to describe a poem or song typically one connected with some kind of religion. Right in the middle of our Bibles we find a book filled with these psalms. What’s neat is that many of the psalms can be traced back to various points in the history of God’s people. Some psalms are filled with gratitude and thanksgiving while others lament the hard times in life. There are psalms that seem to have been used in royal ceremonies with some of the Kings and others written hidden in caves.  One of my favorite things about the Psalms is that it seems to document the everyday life of believers which makes them very relatable to our lives today.

Fun Facts about the Psalms:

  • There are 150 psalms in the book.
  • Psalm 119 is the longest psalm with 176 verses.
  • Psalm 117 is the shortest psalm with only 2 verse.
  • Psalm 118 is in the very middle of the Bible.
  • Psalms is actually divided into 5 smaller books within the book with each section ending with a song of praise called a “doxology”.
    • Book 1: Psalm 1—41
    • Book 2: Psalm 42—72
    • Book 3: Psalm 73—89
    • Book 4: Psalm 90—106
    • Book 5: Psalm 107—150
  • Today, the psalms are used in both Christian and Jewish worship.
  • King David wrote 73 of the 150 psalms

A Few Key Verses and Possible Reflection Questions/Prayers:

Some of us are planning to read through the whole book each week, while others are just focusing in on one verse. Since Psalms is so long we’re dividing it up over three weeks. This section of the weekly intro post might help you narrow down a verse to reflect on for the week, but you do not have to choose one of these verse, pick any section of the book you want! These are just some ideas.

  • I will give thanks to you, LORD, with all my heart; I will tell of all your wonderful deeds.” (Psalm 9:1)
    REFLECTION: What can you give thanks to God for this week? Who will you tell of God’s wonderful deeds in your life?
     
  • The LORD is my light and my salvation— whom shall I fear? The LORD is the stronghold of my life— of whom shall I be afraid? ” (Psalm 27:1)
    REFLECTION: Who or what in your life is trying to make you fearful right now? What does it look like to trust and depend on the Lord in the middle of that fear?

  • The LORD is close to the brokenhearted and saves those who are crushed in spirit. (Psalm 34:18)
    REFLECTION: Who do you know that needs to be reminded that God is near? How can you remind them of the truths in this verse?

  • Lord, I wait for you; you will answer, Lord my God. (Psalm 38:15)
    REFLECTION: What are you waiting on an answer from God for? How can you wait well this week?

God’s Grace in the Psalms:

I think we can find just about any human emotion somewhere in the Psalms. I kind of mentioned this in the summary piece above, and I mention it again because I think that it is where I most see God’s grace currently in the Psalms. Reading through them, especially a lot of them at one time like we’ll be doing the next few weeks, reminds me that God is big enough for whatever I’m thinking and feeling. He can handle my anger, even if it’s aimed toward Him. He can walk with me in my doubt and bring me back to a place of trust. He understands our fears and reassures us in those anxious moments. Not only is God bigger than all our emotions, He also was the one who created us with those emotions. Of course, we can let those feelings lead us into actions that go against His desires, but the emotions themselves are a gift of grace, one that often, if we let it, leads us straight into deeper relationship with Him.

Some Other Resources:

The Challenge:

So now it’s your turn! Pick a verse and settle in this week, or read through the whole book. If you post any picture or blogs on social media, tag them with #66in52challenge so we can all share in this journey together!

66 in 52 Challenge

Reflections on Job: Yet I will trust Him

Trust.

This is the word that rises to the surface as I read through Job.

It takes trust to fall to your knees in grief and worship there after receiving the news of the death of your children.

It takes trust to get up and move forward each day after that.

It takes trust to appeal to what you know about your God when those around you encourage you to give up and curse Him.

It takes trust to stay confident in your identity and convictions when those closest to you question you all the way.

It takes trust to appeal to God knowing how powerful He is but believing that whatever He could do to you would be better than giving in to what you know isn’t true.

It takes trust to humble yourself and admit where you didn’t live up to a perfect standard.

Trust.

Trustbelieves: “Even now, God in heaven is my witness and my protector.” Job 16:19

Trust remembers: “You, the source of my life, showered me with kindness and watched over me.” Job 10:12

Trust stays humble: “What you say is true. No human is innocent in the sight of God. Not once in a thousand times could we win our case if we took him to court. God is wise and powerful— who could possibly oppose him and win? When God becomes angry, he can move mountains before they even know it.” Job 9:2-5

Trust is not afraid to ask the hard questions: “Why should I patiently hope when my strength is gone?” Job 6:11 “Why is life so hard? Why do we suffer?” Job 7:1

Trust helps us remain faithful: “In spite of everything, Job did not sin or accuse God of doing wrong.” Job 1:22

Trust proclaims: “But as for me, I know that my Redeemer lives, and he will stand upon the earth at last. And after my body has decayed, yet in my body I will see God! I will see him for myself. Yes, I will see him with my own eyes. I am overwhelmed at the thought!” Job 19:25-27

Trust stays focused on what’s most important: “Let God All-Powerful be your silver and gold.” Job 22:25

Trust does not depend on sight: “I cannot find God anywhere— in front or back of me, to my left or my right. God is always at work, though I never see him.” Job 23:8-9

Trust relinquishes perceived or desired control: “From the very beginning, God has been in control of all the world.” Job 34:13

Trust leans in when it doesn’t make sense: “Though He slay me, yet I will trust Him…” Job 13:15

Jesus, on the best days and the worst, may I trust You and You alone. Teach me to trust. Teach me the humility and peace, the patience and focus, the determination and proclamation of trust. Always. Amen.